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Friday, July 9, 2010

Making More Geraniums

Each summer, after the geraniums have settled in and started to bloom nice, I take cuttings from them to start new plants.  This fall, I will try to bring as many geranium containers into the house that I can.  Making more plants now gives me "extras" in case some don't survive the winter indoors. 


I have a white geranium, a red geranium, a purple and white Martha Washington geranium and a fuchsia and white ivy geranium.  I even labeled them this year so I'm not guessing next March which plant is which.


I always trim off all the bloom and buds on the cuttings so they will work to make roots instead of flowers.

I also put a cutting of the purple and white Martha Washington geranium in a plastic nursery pot so I can give it to my neighbor after it's rooted.  She has taken cuttings of that geranium the last couple of years with no luck getting it to root.  I told her I would try for her when I do my summer cuttings.  I drop the nursery pot into a clay pot so it won't blow over on our patio.



The cuttings will live just off the patio door steps so I can keep an eye on them.  I'll move them out amongst the other containers when I see they're rooted well. 


The container with the dying (dead) impatiens that was by the air conditioner is closer to the composter. 

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11 comments:

  1. How do you "winter" them all then?

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  2. Free plants we make outselves are the best. You can never have too many geraniums I'm thinking. Have a great weekend.

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  3. I tried making cuttings last year of some geranium and coleus. I was surprised to find that it worked quite well!! It was my first attempt. Some died, but several didn't. I used some rooting powder I found at Lowes--which may have helped? I took mine in late October and kept them in the greenhouse. They proceeded to bloom all winter and are growing this summer so far, though they are still quite small-this year I may try to overwinter a whole plant and see how that goes--it would be nice to start with a bigger specimen next time!

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  4. Good morning. I used to do that too. Great way to get extra plants without the expense of buying them. Love your Martha Washington geranium.
    Marnie

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  5. Excellent! Do you just take a cutting and shove it into the ground, or is there a little more prep work then that? I've read you should use some type of root stimulator?

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  6. Wonderful idea! I might have to do the same. I think geraniums add so much color!

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  7. It's a good idea to try and take cuttings and a lot of satisfaction to be had when they start to grow.I wish you every success.

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  8. I do that more with my scented geraniums == not my garden ones.

    I tried Martha Washington last year (liked the name -- Martha -- but it got too hot where we are and they fizzled (like the pansies do)
    So do you have any Martha Washington secrets?

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  9. I love taking and starting cuttings too.

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  10. I have never started geraniums from cuttings. I did, however save seed from a geranium plant last year and actually have a plant growing from seed! Anyway, I want to try the cutting method. Thanks for sharing the idea!
    Kelly

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  11. ~Rebecca
    In the fall, they get a nice soapy bath to evict any critters in the pots. Then, they come in to live in our family room. I trim back the blooms as they fade. Occassionally, I get a bloom or two in the winter. I don't water them as much. And, I often take more cuttings after they're settled inside. I don't have as good of success with the inside cuttings. They don't get as much light as they'd like inside which is why I lose some of them.

    ~tina
    I'm always finding places for more geraniums.

    ~princessdiva
    Your greenhouse is a great place to start cuttings! All that light. I've used the rooting powder for inside cuttings. I think the heat of summer gets them going outside so I usually skip it. I know a lady who has two huge containers of geraniums she brings inside each winter. They can grow large. I hope yours does.

    ~Marnie
    I should do it more. If only I had the indoor space...

    ~Turling
    I cut where there is a branch in the plant, remove the lower leaves and stick it into some nice new potting mix. Then, water well. Don't let them dry out while they're making those new roots. I've used the rooting powder for starting cuttings indoors but I think the nice warm weather of summer makes geraniums grow well. They usually take with no problem.

    ~Bonnie
    Sometimes, I just stick extra cutting here and there in containers. More plants!

    ~Petrus
    Thanks for stopping by. It is fun.

    ~Martha
    My Martha Washington geranium gets shade late in the day. I don't know if that's a secret or not. Otherwise, I treat her the same as the other geraniums. I put her on the front porch because she's purple and white which goes with my front yard colors.

    ~Darla
    Yea!!

    ~Katydid
    Very good with the seeds. I've never tried to get seeds. I'm always deadheading the geraniums to get more blooms. I hope you get some cuttings to root!

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