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Monday, January 12, 2015

Seeds Ordered

I spent some time with the seed catalogs today and made out my orders this evening.

I knew there would be changes to the edibles list for 2015.  Some varieties were switched and I found two new things!

A more compact variety of basil that does well in containers was selected.  Last year, after I froze all the basil I wanted for winter, I just let the plants flower and feed the pollinators.  With a more compact variety, I may just plant some containers with basil to be decorative this year reserving the option to snag a leaf now and then.

I dropped red salad bowl lettuce from the ordering list. Only one of the catalogs carried it and I kept my ordering to two catalogs to save on shipping.  I might find it locally at the garden center and still plant some.

A specialty melon named tigger got my attention.  It looks interesting and the single serving size of white flesh intrigues me.  I have not eaten it.  I'm just going to try it.

The parsley change was just an availability issue.

The different pumpkin variety claims to ripen faster.  With our temperamental autumn temperatures, I thought faster was better.

The new radish is a purple one.  I like purple!

basil
sweet
emily

lettuce
leaf: red salad bowl

melon
tigger



parsley *
italian
flat leaf
giant of italy

pumpkin
large: jack-o-lantern
medium:  magic lantern

radish
malaga




12 comments:

  1. Good morning!
    Outside my window is spring and I should think about the seeds too.

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  2. That melon variety looks neat--and as a fan of "Winnie the Pooh", I just adore the name!

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  3. That melon caught my eye.

    How do you freeze your basil?

    Happy garden planning ~ FlowerLady

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    Replies
    1. I run basil leaves through the blender with a little water. Then, I pour it into ice cube trays and freeze it. Pop the cubes out to store in a bag and you have basil cubes to throw into soups or what ever. Not for every recipe, but pretty handy.

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  4. I can't believe it's that time already. Where do the month's go eh?

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  5. TIgger looks so intriguing! I have never heard of that. And purple radishes. Never heard of that, either. Glad you are going to try them, and I can't wait to see pictures of your bounty!

    xo

    Sheila

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  6. The white melon does look tasty. It will be interesting to see if it grows as well as the common melon. I was just thinking that I needed to start tomato seeds next month and I don't plant them soon enough when we have an early spring. March seems to be too late for them.

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  7. Seems you've made some great choices! It's so exciting to start our gardening plans this time of year. Something to think about and to look forward to.

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  8. Thanks for sharing your seed list for the year. Melon doesn't do well in my garden, unfortunately. I've got a dreadful verticilum wilt problem and then the insects. I like your choices. Good luck!

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  9. I've started my seeds, too. I have about 10 pots I'm winter sowing and will be growing others under lights. Keeping our seed lists manageable is the hard part! That melon looks like fun. I hope it's tasty. :o)

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  10. The melons and radishes look very interesting! We're trying honeydew melons this year for the first time. We've tried lots of different radishes in the past but last year we discovered Gloriette from Fedco and it was the best radish we've ever grown. It's a standard dark red.

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    Replies
    1. I am intrigued by Gloriette. I will put it on my "to try" list. If not this year, I can order some next year. I'm the radish lover in the house. Good luck on the honeydews. Those would be nice to have too.

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